International Agents 
NeededInternational Business Opportunity!Network Global is seeking international agents worldwide to market a unique international hospitality program. This is a legitimate business opportunity that can generate a substantial monthly residual income with only a few accounts. Serious inquiries only. Not MLM.
LinkExchange
LinkExchange Member


Texas Hunting Leases-East Texas-1998We now have available several tracts of deer, squirrel, and hog hunting leases on a year-round basis. Now you can hunt your own leases year after year. East Texas is fast becoming the area of choice by deer hunters. There are a number of reasons for this, including quality and quantity of the deer being hunted. For the past several years, hunters from all over are discovering that the piney woods of East Texas are more fun to hunt, the size of deer and deer antlers are bigger in the East Texas area, and the prices for quality hunting areas has not skyrocketed like they have in central and south Texas. We have put together several tracts of land from 50 to 700 acres, primarily regrowth areas that have been harvested for timber and replanted. This is prime deer and hog hunting property.

You and your family and friends can select from a number of good, sometimes unhunted properties in several counties of East Texas. If you want more information, follow this link and check it out for yourself.Texas Hunting Leases-East Texas-1998


Trophy Hunters of East Texas-Deer Hunting's Best Kept Secret!

I started deer hunting in Texas in the early sixties, primarily hunting around my home in Rusk County, Texas, and in the Davy Crockett National Forest between Nacogdoches and Crockett Texas in Houston County. I also hunted the river bottoms around Nacogdoches, Lufkin and Jacksonville, Texas, in Nacogdoches, Angelina and Rusk counties. It was not long before I starting hearing about the hill country of Texas, and started hunting places like Llano, Junction, Mason, Fredericksburg, Blanco, Kerrville, Burnet, Rock Springs, and other towns in Llano, Mason, Kerr, Gillespie, Burnet, Blanco, Kimble, San Saba, Travis, and other central or south central Texas counties.

The deer hunting in these areas of Texas is truly a unique experience. No where in the United States is there a concentration of deer like there is in the hill country. There are litterly millions of deer in these counties, and hundreds of thousands are killed every year. I still like to hunt there, and hunted south of Llano this past season.

I have also hunted Arkansas and Alabama, both fine hunting areas. However, my primary area to hunt is now East Texas, and has been for the past fifteen years. Why? Although I love to hunt the hill country because of the number of deer you see hunting, I have not killed a true "trophy deer" in all of the years of hunting the hill country. This is not to say there are not trophy deer in the hill country, I just have not been fortunate enough to kill one.

The reasons I hunt East Texas are numerous and I will try to give a few reasons, the main one of which is "monster bucks" and "big racks". I have seen some really fine racks come out of East Texas over the years. I recently attended a "hunters expo and extravaganza" type show in Shreveport, Louisiana. In conjunction with the show, there was a big buck contest. To be eligible to compete, the bucks had to come from a 100 mile radius of Shreveport (Shreveport is less than twenty five miles from East Texas. The racks at that show were unbelievable. Big, massive, wide and tall racks were shown, as well as a full mount of a huge body deer that the owner said weighed well over 200 lbs.

East Texas is a broad area, from Red River and Bowie Counties on the north to Montgomery, Liberty and Jefferson Counties on the south end. There are national forests that you can hunt. These national forests have a good quantity of deer, although the hunting pressure is tremendous, especially during the first month of the season. One year I hunted the Davy Crockett National Forest, and at the end of the season, we were asked to fill out a survey, such as number of deer seen, number of shots taken, number of deer killed, etc. We all received a letter later from the survey, which said because of the number of accidental shootings reported, your chances of getting "shot at" were better than your chances of "getting a shot at a deer"! This was the last year I hunted the national forest.

Your best bet for killing a trophy deer, is to find private land to lease from the landowner. Almost all of the land in East Texas is owned by private individuals or paper companies. The paper companies also allow hunting on their property. Again, the hunting pressure, like in the national forests, is heavy, and you have to hunt in areas with people you don't know. I have hunted paper mill property for a number of years, and if you find a good spot, you can kill some quality deer.

Private individuals are still your best chance to have a quality deer lease year after year. If you can find a landowner that will lease his land to you, you can develop a good hunting lease, by cultivating and growing food plots and by feeding corn or other food during the year. The problem is that most of the land in East Texas is either a homestead, or is a working farm or ranch, with herds of cattle or other animals that the farmers and ranchers are afraid will get shot by careless hunters. Therefore, you usually have to live in the area or know someone who can talk to the landowner for you.

Most of the land in the East Texas area will be in tracts of less than 1,000 acres, not like in the hill country, where a ranch might well have 10,000 acres or in the brush country of Texas, where a ranch might have 100,000 or 200,000 acres or more. There are hundreds of homesteads where the acreage will only be 10 or 20 acres, with a house or two on the acreage. This is too small to hunt, unless the owner hunts, and most of the time he does not lease out his property to hunters or even allow hunting at all because of the house and the risk of stray gunshots. This brings up a serious note. ALWAYS BE SURE OF YOUR TARGET AND MAKE SURE YOUR SHOTS WOULD NOT RICHOCHET OR BE TOWARDS SOMETHING YOU DO NOT WANT TO KILL! Many a cow, horse, or mule has been shot by being mistaken for a deer in the dawn or dusk time of the day. Unfortunately, there have also been people shot, mistaken for deer or other game. Take your time and make sure of your target before you pull the trigger.

Small tracts of land, if you can lease them is really not a problem to hunt, because of the limited area you can see when hunting. Most of the land in East Texas consists of pine trees, oaks, and other hardwood trees, with lots of underbrush, vines, and small trees. In places, the underbrush is so thick you cannot walk through it with ease. Your visibility will be limited in the early part of the season, until the frosts kill the vegetation and leaves fall off of the trees. Pine Trees do not lose their leaves like the hardwood trees, so some areas will have limited visibility all during the hunting season.

Usually, some of the best places to hunt are on utility right of ways (electric and telephone), and pipeline right of ways. The utility companies have crews that work around the year cutting all trees and brush away from the power lines and telephone lines. Because the vegetation grows so fast, they have to continuously keep it cut back to avoid trees brushing against the lines and causing a short.

There are thousands of oil and gas wells located in East Texas, and hundreds of miles of oil and gas pipelines, buried underground. The oil and gas pipeline companies do not allow any trees to grow on the pipeline right of ways, because the roots would grow down and possibly cause a rupture in the pipeline. They do this by bush hogging (mowing) all of the right of ways several times during the year.

Because the underbrush is so thick in places, deer and other wildlife use these pipelines to travel at times, when moving between feeding grounds and bedding areas. This makes an ideal place to build deer stands and to hunt, if you like to walk and hunt. Because you can sometimes see several hundred yards down a pipeline or power line right of way, you may see several deer cross at 200 or 300 yards. Sometimes these pipelines will curve and the deer seem to want to cross at the curves or where they feel they have less chance of being seen. You can find out where to set up your stand by finding deer trails between the bedding and feeding area.

These pipelines and right of ways also make excellent areas to plant food plots such as oats, rye, wheat and other foods for the times when there are no acorns for the deer to find. By planting several different plots, you will make a feeding area that will attract deer from all over the area.

Deer stands on these pipelines and right of ways should be well hidden, and placed in the hunting area several months before the season. Even if deer are using a trail, if you put up a deer stand or blind, the deer will alter their routes to avoid the stand. If you place the stand there several months before the season, the deer will become accustomed to it, and tend not to spook so bad. They will always look up at it, to see if there is any movement. You should also build alternate stands in the same area, in the event of wind blowing toward the trails. Deer have an uncanny way of scenting you. High winds will cause them to become spooky and will carry your scent farther.

Another favorite place I like to hunt in East Texas is clear cuts and replanted areas of land that has been harvested for timber. In lots of areas, timber companies will harvest timber and completely cut all of the trees in an area. Many times, after all the trees are cut, they will burn off the area. This is ideal for deer hunting. After the burn, the brush growing back attracts the deer in droves. For the next several years, the deer will use this area for feeding and bedding, even more so than before the area was harvested for timber.

If there are tracts of land that have not been harvested, that has lots of acorn trees on it, you can usually find several areas where the deer will bed down in the cutover area, and travel to and from the area with the acorns. Most of this travel will be at dawn and dusk. They will feed a lot at night, expecially during the full moon, and bed down just after daylight. You should build your stand on the edge of the cutover area, where the trails are. Again, you should have your stands built several months before the season. When acorns are plentiful, deer will travel very little, except during the rut, so you want to be in the most likely looking spot at dawn and dusk. The big bucks will hardly ever move after daylight or before dusk, except during the rut. They will bed down in the thickest area possible during the day. You should spend enough time in the area to find deer rubs from the previous year in order to establish the rut route. Deer use the same general area year after year during the pre-rut and rut. By spending lots of time in the area, you will have a better chance of getting the monster rack you have been hunting for.

If you have any comments or suggestions, please email me at:


For details, email: outdoors@wildgoose.com



Wayne Hartt


For details, email: outdoors@wildgoose.com




Texas Hunting Leases-East Texas-1998We now have available several tracts of deer, squirrel, and hog hunting leases on a year-round basis. Now you can hunt your own leases year after year. East Texas is fast becoming the area of choice by deer hunters. There are a number of reasons for this, including quality and quantity of the deer being hunted. For the past several years, hunters from all over are discovering that the piney woods of East Texas are more fun to hunt, the size of deer and deer antlers are bigger in the East Texas area, and the prices for quality hunting areas has not skyrocketed like they have in central and south Texas. We have put together several tracts of land from 50 to 700 acres, primarily regrowth areas that have been harvested for timber and replanted. This is prime deer and hog hunting property.

You and your family and friends can select from a number of good, sometimes unhunted properties in several counties of East Texas. If you want more information, follow this link and check it out for yourself.Texas Hunting Leases-East Texas-1998


For details, email: outdoors@wildgoose.com



ATTENTION HUNTERS-FISHERMEN! Earn money while you hunt and fish. Sell advertising for us to businesses as you travel. Build a network of your own clients around the world and earn money to hunt and fish more!

For details, email: outdoors@wildgoose.com



Read our HUNTING, FISHING & OUTDOORS ONLINE MAGAZINE!If you have hunting gear, supplies, accessories, or leases you would like to advertise, send us an email message. Our magazine currently gets over 1,000 hits per day and we have consistently averaged over 500 hits per day for 3 months in a row. If you want to advertise on the Internet, you cannot find a better Outdoor connection than our magazine. Take a look for yourself.

Hunting, Fishing & Outdoors Online Yellow Pages Advertise or find hunting leases, fishing guides, outfitters, motels, lodges, outdoor gear, and hundreds of other items in the Hunting, Fishing & Outdoors Online Info Mart. Find all types of hunting equipment like deer stands, deer scent, archery equipment, game calls, deer attractants and other hunting supplies in one of our catalogs. If you like Cabela's, Bass Pro Shop, or other catalogs, you will love our list of catalogs. Take a look for yourself.